Fermentation & Cheese Making Workshop Jan 2018   Recently updated !


   

Just as soil needs healthy living beneficial microbes to support strong, resilient, healthy life forms up the food chain, so too our bodies and internal ecosystem need good microbes to keep us strong and healthy.


Details: Join us for a full day workshop this January 13th for our FIRST Fermentation and Cheese Making Workshop hosted by Award winning, accredited permaculture teacher Elisabeth Fekonia, from Australia. Over the last decade, Elisabeth has taught courses that introduces people to the concept of growing foods that are mainly perennials and their beneficial uses. She teaches people to cook up lots of recipes and have a big feast afterwards, usually convincing people of the value of growing these unusual vegetables.
When: Saturday January 13, 2018
Where: Boho Eatery, Langata Road
Costs:  Kshs 8,000

What is fermentation?

Cultured or fermented foods have been part of most ancient cultures for many centuries. In times gone by, fermenting foods was a way to preserve them, so that one would have supplies of food during the sparse cold months. Fermented foods were revered as having healing properties We now understand why these foods are so beneficial to us. There are several benefits to fermenting food. First, fermentation serves to enhance the digestion of food. Your body needs adequate digestive enzymes to properly absorb, digest, and utilize nutrients in food. When vegetables like cabbage and cucumbers are left to steep and sit until the sugars are broken down to promote the growth of bacteria, this is when the vegetables are fermented.

Fermented foods are also filled with beneficial bacteria and natural probiotics that work as reinforcement for the good bacteria in the digestive system and microbiome. Since 70 percent to 80 percent of the immune system lies in the gut, having proper balance of gut flora is important.

Our bodies no longer get a daily intake of protective nutrients, enzymes and beneficial bacteria. This is one contributing factor to the massive rise in chronic digestive and immune disorders in the last few decades. One of the most beneficial food groups to include as part of your daily diet to regain and maintain optimal health is fermented foods.


Workshop programme:         

This full day workshop, comprising of three hours workshops each, will provide you with the knowledge, skills and confidence to go home and make your own healthy fermented foods and drinks and  delicious cheese. It will be fun packed, informative, hands on and very practical. You will discover how simple it is and how you can integrate these amazing techniques in to your daily lives. Don’t miss it!                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

 Cheese Making: Haloumi cheese, cultured butter, ghee, yoghurt, kefir and sour cream making workshop

In this three hour workshop learn how to make Haloumi cheese and turn pasteurized milk and cream back into living probiotic foods. We will be making cultured butter, sample cultured buttermilk and also learn how to make ghee (easily digestible). Yoghurt, kefir and quark will also be covered as well as making sour cream. Participation is by participants in making the Haloumi cheese and the cultured dairy products and tasting of topics covered on the day will be available. Handouts included and cheese cultures will be available for sale too.

 

 

 

 

Feta Cheese and Lactic fermentation 

In this three hour workshop we make a Feta Cheese and explore lactic or wild fermentation. Lactic fermentation is a natural fermentation method that creates zillions of lactic bacteria that are a wonderful source of pro biotics for your inner health. Learn how make these easy ferments for yourself and see how versatile and varied these can be. Ferments on the day include sauerkraut, fermented tomato sauce, fermented carrots with ginger, cucumber pickles, fermented cassava as well as kombucha tea. Participants will be learning how to make these ferments through demonstration and participation and everyone brings home their own jar of sauerkraut. All foods and beverages will be available for taste testing with handouts including all the recipes. Cheese cultures will be available for sale after class.


 About the Instructor

Elisabeth Fekonia is an Award winning, accredited permaculture teacher from Australia.

Elisabeth lives on 6 acres at Black Mountain just west of Cooroy on the Sunshine Coast of Australoa. She has learned many skills over the past 17 years in becoming food self sufficient with the help of their cows and goats for milk and meat, pigs, chooks, bees, worm farms, veggie gardens and fruit trees. Most of their food needs are met from the farm and these are supplemented with sourdough bread made from freshly milled organic wheat with a slab of cheese and a salad from the garden washed down with a glass of fruit wine; her daily food is very satisfying, incredibly healthy and cheap. A home grown and produced diet can’t be compared to what you buy in the shops.

A few years ago Elisabeth thought it a good idea to become a Permaculture teacher to help others to grow and produce their own food. She has achieved this in the form of one day workshops that will help people to make their own cheese, sourdough, wine, miso and tempeh etc, teaching about growing tropical vegetables and also teaching organic gardening courses.
Global crisis or not, self sufficiency is her drive, she wouldn’t live anywhere else but in the country. She loves the life of growing and producing her own food. Her message, “It might seem daunting at first, but it’s up to you to decide what you can do in regards of producing your own food, because if I can do it, anyone can.  I’m only too happy to share my knowledge and experiences to help you on the road to your own food security. I’m sure you’ll never look back when you do”
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